SUNTA Undergraduate Paper Prize Extension of Dealine.

Submissions Due: September 30, 2017 

The Society for Urban, National and Transnational/Global Anthropology is pleased to announce its undergraduate paper prize competition. We are seeking nominations – by faculty – for student papers that address SUNTA‘s interests, including urban life, space and place, transnational social processes, impacts of globalization, and refugees and immigration.  The prize includes a cash award of $150. The winner will be announced at the 2017 AAA meetings in Washington, DC.

Any author who is a current undergraduate or who graduated in the 2017 calendar year is eligible for the competition, as long as the submission was composed while she or he was an undergraduate.  Although submissions will be accepted only from faculty (e.g., students may not submit papers on their own), faculty sponsors need not write letters of recommendation or justification in support.  The faculty nomination is sufficient.

Papers should be no more than 30 double-spaced pages (12 point font), including bibliography, notes and images/figures. The paper’s formatting (e.g., citations, bibliographies etc.) should be consistent throughout.    International entries are encouraged, although papers must be in English.  SUNTA membership is not required.

Please send submissions by email to Friederike Fleischer (f.fleischer406@uniandes.edu.co).   Please direct any queries about the award or alternative submission arrangements to her as well.

Advertisements

“Florida’s broken sentencing system Designed for fairness, it fails to account for prejudice”

By By Josh Salman, Emily Le Coz and Elizabeth Johnson Graphics and site development by Jennifer Borresen and Dak Le. Photos and video by Dan Wagner

http://projects.heraldtribune.com/bias/sentencing/

“Justice has never been blind when it comes to race in Florida. Blacks were first at the mercy of slave masters. Then came Jim Crow segregation and the Ku Klux Klan. Now, prejudice wears a black robe. Half a century after the civil rights movement, trial judges throughout Florida sentence blacks to harsher punishment than whites, a Herald-Tribune investigation found.

The Racial Dot Map

http://demographics.coopercenter.org/racial-dot-map/

“This racial dot map is an American snapshot; it provides an accessible visualization of geographic distribution, population density, and racial diversity of the American people in every neighborhood in the entire country. The map displays 308,745,538 dots, one for each person residing in the United States at the location they were counted during the 2010 Census. Each dot is color-coded by the individual’s race and ethnicity. The map is presented in both black and white and full color versions. In the color version, each dot is color-coded by race”.

The Ideal City: between myth and reality – Call for Abstracts

URBINO (ITALY) 27-29 AUGUST 2015

The RC21 Conference 2015 will be hosted by the School of Social and Political Sciences – Department of Economics, Society, and Politics at the University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Italy.

The proposed abstracts besides addressing the single sessions’ topics should be inspired by the conference theme of ‘The ideal city between myth and reality’

The selection process

The deadline for abstract submission is 31 January 2015. Each abstract will be classified by the session organizers into three categories:

A – Accepted abstract to be presented at the conference;
B – Accepted abstract as a contribution to the conference (available online) (this paper might be presented in case of drop outs);
C – Refused abstract. The paper will not be presented at the conference.

Abstracts should be sent by e-mail to abstracts@rc21.org and to the session organizers (see email addresses listed below).

Authors of accepted abstracts should send their paper not later than 15 June 2013 to: papers@rc21.org and to the session organizers. The accepted papers will be published online on the www.rc21.org website only if submitted in time.

Abstracts should include the following information:

A – The session to which the abstract is submitted.
B – A synthesis of the issues to be addressed in the paper, the hypothesis underlying them, the empirical and/or the theoretical basis, and the structure of the paper (300-500 words).
C – The contact of the author(s): Name(s), affiliation, address, a phone nr. (will not be made public) and an e-mail address.

http://www.rc21.org/en/conferences/urbino2015/

 

Cultural Domain Analysis (July 27-31, 2015) Summer Course

Supported by the National Science Foundation

Cultural domain analysis (CDA) is the study of how people in a group think about lists of things that somehow go together. These can be physical, observable things—kinds of wine, kinds of music, rock singers, foods that are appropriate for dessert, medicinal plants, ice cream flavors, animals you can keep at home, horror movies, symptoms of illness—or conceptual things like occupations, roles, emotions, things to do on vacation, things you can do to help the environment, and so on. The method comes from work in cognitive anthropology but it has since been picked up in fields such as marketing, product development, and public health. CDA involves systematic interviewing to get lists of items that comprise a coherent cognitive domain.

The data collection methods covered in this five-day course include: free lists, pile sorts, triad tests, paired comparisons and ratings. The data analysis methods include: multidimensional scaling, hierarchical clustering, property fitting (PROFIT), quadratic assignment procedure (QAP), and consensus analysis.

The methods covered in this course are based on the analysis of profile matrices and similarity matrices. The class covers the theory behind these matrices and how they can be used in many different areas of research, including the analysis of qualitative data (like text and images) and in social network analysis. Participants get hands-on practice with data collection techniques and with data analysis using Anthropac and Ucinet software.

http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/cultural-domain-analysis/

Statistics in Ethnographic Research (July 20-24, 2015) Summer Course

Supported by the National Science Foundation

This five-day course covers the concepts and skills needed for analyzing and interpreting quantitative data collected as part of ethnographic field research. Researchers will learn how to: (1) develop quantitative measures of behaviors, attitudes, and material objects; (2) provide group-level summaries of quantitative data; (3) frame expectations about group differences and relationships between variables; (4) test those expectations with quantitative data; and (5) justify why a specific test is appropriate for a given kind of data.

In addition to lectures, the course involves class activities, visualizations, and analysis of real data, to illustrate the main concepts and skills and to walk participants through the steps of quantitative data collection and analysis. A supplemental web site contains primary course materials—lecture powerpoints, readings, activity modules, and datasets analyzed in the course.

A key goal of the course is to familiarize participants with techniques for analyzing the kinds of quantitative data commonly collected as part of ethnographic field research.

http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/statistics-in-ethnographic-research/

 

Short Courses on Research Methods

Supported by the National Science Foundation

Now in its tenth year, the SCRM offers a program of intensive, five-day courses on research methods in cultural anthropology. The program is directed by H. Russell Bernard, with support from the National Science Foundation. The SCRM courses are held at the Duke University Marine Laboratories in Beaufort, North Carolina.

The SCRM program is for colleagues who already have the Ph.D. in anthropology and who want to broaden or improve their skills. Because the program is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation, eligibility is restricted to colleagues working in the U.S. (regardless of citizenship) or to U.S. citizens working abroad. The program covers room, board, and tuition. Participants are responsible for costs associated with travel to and from the Institute and required textbooks.

http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/