Call for Book Manuscripts – Maps, Spaces & Cultures

Edited by Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University) and Asa Simon Mittman (California State University, Chico). Editorial board: Michiel van Groesen (University of Amsterdam), Ricardo Padrón (University of Virginia), Ayesha Ramachandran (Yale University) and Dan Terkla (Illinois Wesleyan University). This innovative series seeks monographs and essay collections that investigate how notions of space, geography, and mapping shaped medieval and early modern cultures. While the history of cartography has traditionally focused on internal developments in European mapping conventions and technologies,  pre-modern scribes, illuminators, and printers of maps tended to work in multiple genres. Spatial thinking informed and was informed by multiple epistemologies and perceptions of the order of nature.
 Maps, Spaces, Cultures therefore integrates the study of cartography and geography within cultural history. It  puts genres that reflected and constituted spatial thinking into dialogue with the cultures that produced and consumed them, as well as with those they represented. The editors welcome submissions from scholars of the histories of art, material culture, colonialism, exploration, ethnography (including that of peoples described as monsters), encounters, literature,  philosophy, religion, science and knowledge, as well as of the history of cartography and related disciplines. They encourage interdisciplinary submissions that cross traditional historical, geographical, or methodological boundaries, that include works from outside Western Europe and outside the Christian tradition, and that develop new analytical approaches to pre-modern spatial thinking, cartography, and the geographical imagination. Authors are cordially invited to write to either of the series editors, Surekha Davies (surekha.davies@gmail.com) and Asa Simon Mittman (asmittman@mail.csuchico.edu), or to the  publisher at Brill, Arjan van Dijk (dijk@brill.com), to discuss the submission of proposals and/or full manuscripts.
For Brill’s Open Access options click here: http://www.brill.com/brill-open-0 

Cultural Domain Analysis (July 27-31, 2015) Summer Course

Supported by the National Science Foundation

Cultural domain analysis (CDA) is the study of how people in a group think about lists of things that somehow go together. These can be physical, observable things—kinds of wine, kinds of music, rock singers, foods that are appropriate for dessert, medicinal plants, ice cream flavors, animals you can keep at home, horror movies, symptoms of illness—or conceptual things like occupations, roles, emotions, things to do on vacation, things you can do to help the environment, and so on. The method comes from work in cognitive anthropology but it has since been picked up in fields such as marketing, product development, and public health. CDA involves systematic interviewing to get lists of items that comprise a coherent cognitive domain.

The data collection methods covered in this five-day course include: free lists, pile sorts, triad tests, paired comparisons and ratings. The data analysis methods include: multidimensional scaling, hierarchical clustering, property fitting (PROFIT), quadratic assignment procedure (QAP), and consensus analysis.

The methods covered in this course are based on the analysis of profile matrices and similarity matrices. The class covers the theory behind these matrices and how they can be used in many different areas of research, including the analysis of qualitative data (like text and images) and in social network analysis. Participants get hands-on practice with data collection techniques and with data analysis using Anthropac and Ucinet software.

http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/cultural-domain-analysis/

Statistics in Ethnographic Research (July 20-24, 2015) Summer Course

Supported by the National Science Foundation

This five-day course covers the concepts and skills needed for analyzing and interpreting quantitative data collected as part of ethnographic field research. Researchers will learn how to: (1) develop quantitative measures of behaviors, attitudes, and material objects; (2) provide group-level summaries of quantitative data; (3) frame expectations about group differences and relationships between variables; (4) test those expectations with quantitative data; and (5) justify why a specific test is appropriate for a given kind of data.

In addition to lectures, the course involves class activities, visualizations, and analysis of real data, to illustrate the main concepts and skills and to walk participants through the steps of quantitative data collection and analysis. A supplemental web site contains primary course materials—lecture powerpoints, readings, activity modules, and datasets analyzed in the course.

A key goal of the course is to familiarize participants with techniques for analyzing the kinds of quantitative data commonly collected as part of ethnographic field research.

http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/statistics-in-ethnographic-research/

 

Short Courses on Research Methods

Supported by the National Science Foundation

Now in its tenth year, the SCRM offers a program of intensive, five-day courses on research methods in cultural anthropology. The program is directed by H. Russell Bernard, with support from the National Science Foundation. The SCRM courses are held at the Duke University Marine Laboratories in Beaufort, North Carolina.

The SCRM program is for colleagues who already have the Ph.D. in anthropology and who want to broaden or improve their skills. Because the program is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation, eligibility is restricted to colleagues working in the U.S. (regardless of citizenship) or to U.S. citizens working abroad. The program covers room, board, and tuition. Participants are responsible for costs associated with travel to and from the Institute and required textbooks.

http://qualquant.org/methodsmall/scrm/

Photo Contest LASA2015 / Precariedades, exclusiones, emergencias

https://www.facebook.com/LatinAmericanStudiesAssociation

“The camera is another instrumental extension of our senses, one that can record on a low scale of abstraction. The camera, by its optical character, has whole vision.” Visual Anthropology: Photography as a Research Method by John Collier Jr., Malcolm Collier, Edward T. Hall

Third Place/ Tercer Lugar Punta Cana, Republica Dominicana – By Damian Liviche A pesar de la fachada de resorts 5 estrellas, el trasfondo de esa ciudad oculta historias de malas condiciones laborales, sacrificio y esfuerzo de personas que viajan hasta ahí de todos lados del país en busqueda de un futuro mejor en la industria del turismo. En la foto: Hombre se refugia del sol del mediodía bajo una tabla de madera en su descanso para almorzar.

Third Place/ Tercer Lugar
Punta Cana, Republica Dominicana – By Damian Liviche
A pesar de la fachada de resorts 5 estrellas, el trasfondo de esa ciudad oculta historias de malas condiciones laborales, sacrificio y esfuerzo de personas que viajan hasta ahí de todos lados del país en busqueda de un futuro mejor en la industria del turismo. En la foto: Hombre se refugia del sol del mediodía bajo una tabla de madera en su descanso para almorzar.

2nd Place/ Segundo Lugar Ciudad de Juarez Mexico - By Corrie Boudreaux The Raramuri people are an indigenous group in northern Mexico. In Ciudad Juarez, most Raramuris (also known as Tarahumara) live in a colonia with unpaved streets in the hilly northwest part of the city, where they are able to preserve their language and some traditional customs, but find themselves excluded from participation in the mainstream economic and social activities of the city.

2nd Place/ Segundo Lugar
Ciudad de Juarez Mexico – By Corrie Boudreaux
The Raramuri people are an indigenous group in northern Mexico. In Ciudad Juarez, most Raramuris (also known as Tarahumara) live in a colonia with unpaved streets in the hilly northwest part of the city, where they are able to preserve their language and some traditional customs, but find themselves excluded from participation in the mainstream economic and social activities of the city.

First Place/ Primer Lugar Lima, Peru – By Giselle Vila Los niños de la Escuela 5128 "Sagrado Corazón de María" en Nuevo Pachacútec, Ventanilla, estudian sobre la arena y con infraestructura precaria. Un proyecto de alumnos de la PUCP procuró llevar talleres artísticos para el desarrollo de habilidades emocionales. Los niños terminaron enseñando a los jóvenes de la PUCP cuáles son las habilidades que se requieren para sobrevivir en la arena.

First Place/ Primer Lugar
Lima, Peru – By Giselle Vila
Los niños de la Escuela 5128 “Sagrado Corazón de María” en Nuevo Pachacútec, Ventanilla, estudian sobre la arena y con infraestructura precaria. Un proyecto de alumnos de la PUCP procuró llevar talleres artísticos para el desarrollo de habilidades emocionales. Los niños terminaron enseñando a los jóvenes de la PUCP cuáles son las habilidades que se requieren para sobrevivir en la arena.

HALPERIN MEMORIAL FUND – CALL FOR APPLICATIONS 2015

The Halperin Memorial Fund Committee is pleased to announce that the 2015 award represents an increase over previous years: $2000 for initial research field work, plus $500 for travel to the meetings of the Society for Economic Anthropology to present initial results.

The Rhoda Halperin Memorial Fund celebrates the life and work of Rhoda Halperin by supporting PhD students in anthropology who emulate her love of economic anthropology and concern for people on the social margin. In memory of Rhoda’s convivial collegiality, the Fund also encourages student professional development through participation in the scholarly meetings of the SEA and AAA. To meet these goals, students engaged in economic research focused on social exclusion and poverty are provided small grants for preliminary dissertation field work and subsequent travel money to present their findings at the Society for Economic Anthropology annual conference [http://econanthro.org/awards/halperin-memorial-fund/].

Because Rhoda Halperin’s career exemplified the integration of anthropological theory with social activism, for the purposes of this award, economic anthropology is broadly defined to include applied and non-applied perspectives, research that engages with issues of poverty, exclusion from the political process, and access to education.

DONATIONS TO THE FUND
The Halperin Memorial Fund is a fund of the Society for Economic Anthropology, a Section of the American Anthropological Association, which is a 501(c)3 organization. Donations to The Halperin Memorial Fund are typically exempt from federal income tax, as are membership fees, but please consult your tax advisor regarding your specific situation. When you make a donation to support the Halperin Memorial Fund by check, please make your check to “SEA/American Anthropological Association” and note that the donation is for the Halperin Memorial Fund.
American Anthropological Association
attn: Accounting
2300 Clarendon Blvd, Suite 1301
Arlington, VA 22201-3386

ELIGIBILITY
a. Any student enrolled in an anthropology (or allied field) doctoral program, regardless of citizenship or nation, is eligible for the award.
b. Strong preference is given to students early in the dissertation process rather than to those who are further along and have already developed their proposals.
c. The funds are not intended for language study.

APPLICATION AND DEADLINE
Applicants who meet the eligibility requirements may apply for the award by providing the following materials by the deadline listed below. All materials should be submitted via email to Martha Rees (halperinaward@gmail.com<mailto:halperinaward@gmail.com>) by December 15, 2014. We will announce awards by February 15, 2015.
a. Proposal Cover sheet
b. Abstract (100 words)
c. Project description, < 500 words about research goals, itinerary, primary research tasks, potential outcomes d. Curriculum Vitae e. Letter of recommendation (included or under separate cover) Find application forms at [http://econanthro.org/awards/halperin-memorial-fund/].

THE AWARD
Recipients receive $2,000 for preliminary PhD research, issued upon acceptance of the award and notification to the Treasurer of the SEA [http://econanthro.org/awards/halperin-memorial-fund/]
Recipients receive a one-year membership in the Society for Economic Anthropology.
Recipients receive $500 to supplement the costs of traveling to the SEA spring conference during the year following the research award to present a poster or paper on the dissertation research or background work.